Benefits of Getting Your Dog Fixed

getting your dog fixed

There are pros and cons associated with getting your dog fixed, regardless of gender. When you do so, you render the dog incapable of parenting puppies. There are lots of questions to ask yourself before, like:

  • should you fix your dog
  • how much does it cost to get your dog fixed
  • is it safe to get your dog fixed
  • when to fix your dog

The Benefits of Getting Your Dog Fixed – Neutering Your Dog

Avoiding unwanted puppies, for one, is a good thing, but there are other benefits of getting your dog fixed, as below.

Calmer dog. This is especially true in males because there’s less testosterone in his system.

Less aggression. Your male dog, thanks to the lower levels of testosterone, will be less aggressive. It could even reduce or eliminate altogether his roaming and humping habits. (Humping after your male dog is neutered is more a dominance-related behavior).

Reduction of likelihood of some diseases. When neutering male dogs, it reduces their risk of getting prostate diseases and testicular cancer.

Less marking. Male dogs mark their territory for a reason. But, a neutered male has less incentive to do so.

Reduces enlarged prostate. Fixing a senior male dog that’s intact can reduce his enlarged prostate.

Read also: Dog Hemorrhoids – How to Treat Them to Make your Dog Happy Again

Things to Watch for After Having Your Dog Neutered

getting your dog fixed

Your dog will probably be wearing an Elizabethan collar after the surgery to prevent him from licking the incision. This may be provided by the vet or you can purchase one at pet stores. Do not remove it, even when sleeping.

If there’s coughing for more than two days, contact the vet, (as above).

Should there be liquid draining from the incision, contact the vet. You’ll probably need to bring your dog in for examination.

How to Prepare Your Dog for Surgery

Your vet may recommend pre-surgical blood work to ensure he’s healthy for the procedure. If your dog is healthy and young, you typically don’t need to have the blood work done – the choice is yours.

The vet will provide you with all the instructions to prepare your dog for surgery. In general, your dog should be restricted food for a minimum of 8 hours prior to the surgery. These are precautions to eliminate nausea caused by anesthesia.

getting your dog fixed

Post-surgery Expectations

  • It’s quite common for male dogs to go home the day of the surgery.
  • Expect the dog’s scrotum to be swollen for the first few days, like the surgery was never even performed.
  • Expect your dog to be nauseous for a couple of days. This is normal, so there’s no need to fuss over him, and he’ll be just fine if he skips a couple of meals.
  • In about a week or so, your vet will ask you to return to the clinic to remove his stitches.
  • Keep his Elizabethan collar on at all time to stop him from licking his stitches, which can hinder healing.
  • Restrict exercise for a few days. Too much physical activity can result in the incision opening.
  • Sometimes there is bruising around the incision.

Spaying Your Dog

Spaying your dog is basically done to prevent female dogs from ever getting pregnant. The spay surgery is a procedure that removes the uterus and both the ovaries in females. It’s a much more serious, yet common surgery than the one performed on males.

The Benefits of Getting Your Dog Spayed

Spaying is the responsible choice dog owners make to reduce pet overpopulation. It’s also the choice to be free of her being in heat.

getting your dog fixed

A female dog has to wear sanitary pads. Without them, your home will be very messy. And, you can’t leave her outdoors because all the male dogs in the neighborhood will jump the fence to get to her.

Eliminating the offensive odor that comes with a female dog in heat.

A female dog in heat is a magnet to male dogs. All of them will want her and you won’t be able to keep them away. You could end up with numerous pregnancies and litters you don’t want.

Getting your dog spayed can reduce the risk of certain diseases and illness like cancer of the mammary gland or pyometra, which is an infection of the uterus that’s life-threatening and very common.

How Often Does a Female Dog Go Into Heat?

An un-spayed female dog will go into heat every 8 months or so. This lasts for a period of about 3 weeks at a time! And this goes on for their whole lives – there’s no menopause to look forward to. 

The Best Time to Spay Your Dog

Consider this – you can spare yourself any unwanted pregnancies, unwanted aggressive and hormonal male dogs, and the unpleasant odor and mess of a dog in heat. And you get your dog spayed from the day she turns 8 weeks of age and up.

Read also: How to Make a Dog Live Longer – Choose the Right Dog Food

You should aim to spay your dog before her first heat, although it can be done later. Keep in mind that the female dog can go into her first heat cycle as early as 6 months.

How to Prepare Your Female Dog for Surgery

Your vet may recommend presurgical blood work to ensure he’s healthy for the procedure. If your dog is healthy and young, you typically don’t need to have the blood work done – the choice is yours.

The vet will provide you with all the instructions to prepare your dog for surgery. In general, your dog should be restricted food for a minimum of 8 hours prior to the surgery. These are precautions to eliminate nausea caused by anesthesia.

How Will My Dog Be After Surgery? Post-surgery Expectations

You may be able to take your dog home later on the day of the surgery. Some clinics, however, may prefer to keep her overnight for precautions.

Most dogs don’t require any pain medications, but some do. Your vet will provide any if necessary.

Expect that your dog may not be herself for a couple of days and not eat normally.

Your dog’s throat may be irritated due to the anesthesia tube inserted down her throat during the procedure. As this is normal, there’s no need to be alarmed if your dog coughs for about two days or so. If longer, contact the vet.

For the week following the surgery, exercise should be restricted. Too much physical activity after the procedure can result in swelling and possibly cause an accumulation of fluid beneath the incision.

You’ll be instructed to return to the vet with your dog about a week to 10 days following the surgery to remove stitches.

Things to Watch for After Having Your Dog Spayed

Your dog will probably be wearing an Elizabethan collar after the surgery to prevent her from licking the incision. This may be provided by the vet or you can purchase one at pet stores. Do not remove it, even when sleeping.

If there’s coughing for more than two days, contact the vet, (as above).

Should there be liquid draining from the incision, contact the vet. You’ll probably need to bring your dog in for examination.